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Tier 1 - Universal Supports


What is PBIS?

PBIS is a positive, proactive, and preventive approach to behavior. It is an evidence-based, data driven process by which schools work to increase appropriate social behavior, attendance, and student achievement. The goal of PBIS is to design effective environments and provide a continuum of evidence based behavior supports for all students in all settings of the school.



The PBIS Process:






The PBIS Framework:




Forging Relationships

Research: Students who are connected to school are more likely to stay in school and less likely to engage in high risk or dangerous behaviors (Catalano, Oesterle, Fleming, and Hawkins, 2004). Students with a feeling of closeness to their teachers have been shown to work harder and get better grades (Klem & Connell, 2004; Wang & Holcombe, 2010).

 All staff members are expected to engage in activities to intentionally get to know and connect with student.  Research shows that if we make connections with our students, off task behaviors decrease and academic achievement increases.


Defining Expectations

Research: Across all studies, “the average number of disruptions in classes where rules and procedures were effectively implemented was 28 percentile points lower than the average number of disruptions in classes where that was not the case” (Marzano, 2003).

Common area and classroom expectations at BMS fall under the “umbrella” of BARK.  


 Classroom Expectations    
     
 Be Safe    Kindness Towards All
     
 Hands, feet, and belongings to self
 Ask and receive permission to leave the room
  Understand the differences in others
Always be fair and polite
     
 Act Responsibly    Respect Self and Others
     
 Be prepared for classroom activities
 Take ownership of your actions
 Use equipment, supplies, and technology appropriately
  Accept adult re-direction
Be an active listener and learner
Appreciate the thoughts, opinions, and boundaries of others




 Beadle Common Area Expectations    
     
 Be Safe    
 Act Responsibly    
 Respect Self & Others    
 Kindness Towards All    

   
  Commons    School Grounds
Accept adult re-direction
Use appropriate voice
Keep hands, feet, and belongings to self
Clean up after yourself
Arrive & leave during appropriate times
Sit and enjoy time with others
Maintain safe walking path
  Accept adult re-direction
Use appropriate voice
Keep hands, feet, and belongings to self
Clean up after yourself
Report unsafe activity to adults
Be aware of your surroundings
Use crosswalks and sidewalks appropriately
     
 Gym    Restrooms
Accept adult re-direction
Use appropriate voice
Keep hands, feet, and belongings to self
Clean up after yourself
Arrive & leave during appropriate times
Sit and enjoy time with others
Ask permission before leaving the gym
Use equipment appropriately

  Accept adult re-direction
Use appropriate voice
Keep hands, feet, and belongings to self
Clean up after yourself
Use facilities appropriately
Wash hands with soap and water
Respect the privacy of others
     
 MPR    Hallways
Accept adult re-direction
Use appropriate voice
Keep hands, feet, and belongings to self
Clean up after yourself
Use good table manners
Be accepting of everyone


  Accept adult re-direction
Use appropriate voice
Keep hands, feet, and belongings to self
Clean up after yourself
Keep travel areas and access to lockers clear
Walk safely and promptly
Gather materials and move to class



Acknowledging Expectations

Research: Delivering praise and positive reinforcement increases on task behavior (Ferguson, & Houghton,1992), student attention (Broden, Bruce, Mitchell, Carter, & Hall, 1970), compliance (Wilcox, Newman, & Pitchford, 1988), student motivation, accuracy of responding & task persistence (Keller, Brady, & Taylor, 2005). On-task behavior is even greater when praise for specific behavior is given, versus general praise. (Chalk & Bizo, 2004)

At Beadle, we have implemented four intentional ways in which to acknowledge others in the building.  All of the forms can be found in the mail room or library.  



Engaging in Systematic Supervision

Research: Use of active supervision resulted in a classroom-wide decrease in minor behavioral incidents (De Pry & Sugai, 2002) and accounted for the most variance in problem behavior in non-classroom transition settings (Colvin, Sugai, Good & Lee, 1997)


 Feature    Elements/Components
 Movement   Constant
High Rate
Randomized
Targets known problem areas
 Scanning   Constant
Targets both appropriate and inappropriate behaviors
Targets known problem areas
Uses both visual and aural cues
Increases opportunities for positive contact
 Positive Contact   Friendly, helpful, open demeanor
Proactive, non-contingent
High rate of delivery
 Positive Reinforcement   Immediate
Contingent on behavior
Consistent (with behavior and across staff)
High rate
 Instructional Responses    Immediate
Contingent on behavior
Non-argumentative, non-critical
Specific to behavior
Systematic:  correction, model, lead, test, and retest
Consistent (with behavior and across staff)

Responding to Problem Behavior

 

Research: Providing direct, brief, and explicit error corrections following undesired behavior decreased such behavior (McAllister, Stachowiak, Baer, & Conderman, 1969). Error corrections or reprimands that were loud in tone were less effective than quiet or discreet corrections (O’Leary & Becker, 1968). Error corrections that were brief (i.e., 1 to 2 words) were more effective than longer error corrections (i.e., 2 or more phrases; Abramowitz, O’Leary, & Futtersak, 1988). Corrections that were delivered consistently were superior to those delivered inconsistently (Acker & O’Leary, 1988)

All staff members are expected to manage minor problem behavior using instructional responses and classroom-based interventions.